Saturday, September 24, 2011

A Voice Bleeding Remedy: Staunch it With Some NF!

A quick announcement to promote an SAT'er! If you ever followed my link to Hilary Graham's interview over at From the Write Angle you'll recall her book REUNITED, which now has a cover. It's pretty darn eye-catching, check it out!

Earlier I talked to you guys about the newly-minted BBC term, voice bleeding. It exists. It's a nasty little burrowing virus that will slide inside your brain and infect the gray matter with the voice of whatever writer you may be reading at the time. The voice bleeding virus thrives on creative minds, reducing us to a toxic replica of whoever we happen to be reading at the moment, especially if they hail from the same genre as our own.

How do you combat this virus? Is it something you will never be free of, like herpes? Is this a long-term infection requiring dose after dose of antibiotics? Should you lie quivering in fear under your blanket whenever a tasty looking bit of fiction tempts you?

Don't worry, my friends. There is an answer.

You CAN read while you're writing. You CAN free yourself from the scourge of voice bleeding. You CAN indulge in some published pages while whaling on the WIP.

It's called non-fiction.

Now don't get me wrong, non-fiction requires voice as well. But the chances of a well-styled narrative NF voice sliding into your YA paranormal are significantly less than if your brain is munching on the latest urban fantasy beach candy.

I hear your cries of pain. But non-fiction!!! It's so.... true and... boring!!

Not so my friends. Hit up some of these titles if you want to learn more about why we're alive, what happens when you're not, and how to avoid people, places and diseases that might make you that way:

WATER: THE EPIC STRUGGLE FOR WEALTH, POWER & CIVILIZATION by Steven Solomon - So you're aware that we need water, but do you know the ins and outs of the political maneuvering, wars, and untold deaths of millions that is intertwined with the story of water? Prolly not.

STIFF by Mary Roach - You're dead! Great - now what? You'd be surprised how many options you've got. Mary Roach explores the myriad of choices your corpse has. Me? I'm going with composting.

THE DEVIL IN THE WHITE CITY by Erik Larsen - Wanna know more about America's first serial killer, and how he used the World's Fair to his advantage? Sure you do.

THE BEAUTIFUL CIGAR GIRL by Daniel Stashower - Mary Roger's murder in 1841 was the first instance of a media frenzy, and it had the makings of a blockbuster. A renowned cigar-peddling beauty with a checkered past winds up dead... and nobody knows who did it. The murder got under the skin of New Yorkers, including one troubled genius named Edgar Allan Poe, who was inspired to write "The Mystery of Marie Roget."

THE LOST CITY OF Z by David Grann - A mysterious city in the jungle, explorers disappearing into thin air, obsession and madness. You're interested, right?

THE SPECKLED MONSTER by Jennifer Lee Carrell - Read this history of smallpox and the people who willingly infected themselves with it in order to create a vaccine and you'll never be more thankful for the CDC.

3 comments:

Jo-Ann said...

What a great idea! I totally love it!

The only problem is... I would need to resist the urge to pepper my fiction manuscript with a bit of completely irrelevant trivia from whatever non-fiction I happened to be reading. Not that it's a bad thing. It might even rev up an otherwise lacklustre sub-plot (or main plot!).

Anita Grace Howard said...

Great post! And I love your terminology. The SPECKLED MONSTER?? Yay, that is totally up my alley. I'm all over that one. Thanks for the great NF recs!

Mindy McGinnis said...

Jo-Ann - I fix the whole "fact dropping" issue by just pelting my friends and co-workers with random information while reading NF. They tend to either think I'm either intelligent or very, very weird.

Anita - Dude, SPECKLED MONSTER will have you washing your hands pretty much every hour.