Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Wednesday WOLF

I'm such a big nerd that I tend to look up word origins in my spare time because I'm fascinated by our language. The odder the origin, the better. I've got a collection of random information in my brain that makes me an awesome Trivial Pursuit partner, but is completely useless when it comes to real world application. Like say, job applications.

I thought I'd share some of this random crap with you in the form of another acronym-ific series. I give you - Word Origins from Left Field - that's right, the WOLF. Er... ignore the fact that the "from" doesn't fit.

This week I came across something awesome and fitting. As I am such a big fan of the inane and trivial I looked up the origin or the word... trivial.

Trivial has its origins in the physical layout of Ancient Rome. Say what? No really. We've learned a lot from the Romans but one thing we didn't take from them is street grids. Ancient Rome was a twisty, turny city. There were many places where three roads converged, dumping all their foot traffic into a convenient location for temples and food carts. And who wants to eat alone? Lollygagging and gossiping became a trademark of these areas, and any news that one overheard there was usually of the non-important sort, thus it was tri (Latin prefix for "three") via (Latin for "way" or "road").

8 comments:

Jo-Ann said...

That's so cool. I'm going to ask santa for an Etymological dictionary for christmas.

Sarah B said...

The Trivial Pursuit boards means so much more to me now. And I have you to thank. Will be thinking of the Cat every time I play.

Mindy McGinnis said...

Isn't that a fun one? Thanks for stopping by Jo-Ann!

Liza Martz & Friends said...

Now that is downright cool!

Mindy McGinnis said...

Glad you liked it!

TeenLibrarianChristina said...

How have I been playing trivia games for all these years and not known that! Cool!

Deb R.H. said...

Ahh, that's neat!

Matt Sinclair said...

As soon as you mentioned that its origins were from ancient Rome, I understood. But how had I not realized this before? Very cool.